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Tiny Art

Work by Hasan Kale from Think Small: The Tiniest Art in the World by Eva Katz, published by Chronicle Books 2018.

Work by Hasan Kale from Think Small: The Tiniest Art in the World by Eva Katz, published by Chronicle Books 2018.

 

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Salavat Fidai

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Fidai started his career as a lawyer; he only turned to art after being laid off during Russia’s fiscal crisis in 2013. With time on his hands, he returned to his childhood pastime of carving. Raised by artist-parents, he remembers sculpting forms from bits of chalk as a young boy.

Khara Ledonne

Work by Khara Ledonne from Think Small: The Tiniest Art in the World by Eva Katz, published by Chronicle Books 2018.

Work by Khara Ledonne from Think Small: The Tiniest Art in the World by Eva Katz, published by Chronicle Books 2018.

Ledonne began her art career as a muralist in New York City, but after painting a mural at the Empire State Building, she hit a different sort of wall and decided to stop working on such a massive scale. The project got her to explore the opposite extreme: painting in miniature.

Dina Brodsky

Work by Dina Brodsky from Think Small: The Tiniest Art in the World by Eva Katz, published by Chronicle Books 2018.

Work by Dina Brodsky from Think Small: The Tiniest Art in the World by Eva Katz, published by Chronicle Books 2018.

 

 

Danielle Clough

Work by Danielle Clough from Think Small: The Tiniest Art in the World by Eva Katz, published by Chronicle Books 2018.

Work by Danielle Clough from Think Small: The Tiniest Art in the World by Eva Katz, published by Chronicle Books 2018.

 

Haute Couture

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The creation of selective customized garments and clothing is called haute couture. It is a high end variety of fashion, which is crafted by hand right from the start till the end, with all the processing in between. During its making the high quality, type of clothing, and classy and unusual fabric is used which is usually sewn with extreme precision, particularly to the details. The task is majorly performed by the very skilled and experienced sewers with the help of hand-executed methods that are immensely time-consuming. These particular dresses and materials are marketed and presented in the Paris couture fashion week. Global haute couture market is segregated based on geographical region as Europe, Asia Pacific, North America, and Rest of the World (RoW). Among all of these North America is foreseen to emerge as a leader in the market.

Some of the major companies leading the global haute couture market are Chanel, Atelier Versace, Zuhair Murad, Givenchy, Saint Laurent, Stephane, Shiaparrelli, Viktor&Rolf, Guo Pei, Yuima Nakazato, Alexis Mabille, Dior, Giorgio Armani Prive, Jean Paul Gauthier, Ellie Saab, Ralph&Russo, Julien Fournie, Valentino, Giambattista Valli, Iris Van Herpen, and Georges Hobeika.

 

They Still Dont Know About “Las Meninas”

Las Meninas

Diego Velázquez

Las Meninas1656
Museo Nacional del Prado
Artist Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez was born in 1599 in Seville, Spain, to a family of minor nobility. He demonstrated an aptitude for painting at around 11 years old and , became an apprentice to the painter Juan de Herrera . Velaquez went on to study for five years under Francisco Pacheco, today known for his technical, Mannerist style. Velázquez would eventually marry Pacheco’s daughter, Juana, and the elder painter would remain a mentor to him.
Detail of Doña Margarita and the titular meninas in Las Meninas.

Detail of Doña Margarita and the titular meninas in Las Meninas.

It is probably the most controversial, talked about, analyzed and imitated painting in history. The painting represents a scene from daily life in the palace of Felipe IV.

At the center of the chamber stands the princess—also referred to as the empress and the infanta—Doña Margarita Maria of Austria, the first child of Philip IV and his second wife Mariana. The princess was Philip’s fourth child, and is pictured at the age of five or six; she was one of the artist’s favorite subjects, and, per the king’s orders, would paint her portrait several times after.

Detail of Maribárbola and Nicolasito Pertusato in Las Meninas.

Detail of Maribárbola and Nicolasito Pertusato in Las Meninas.

Detail of the background figures in Las Meninas.

Detail of the background figures in Las Meninas.

Directly to her left and right are the titular meninas, the ladies-in-waiting, who would accompany and attend to the young royal in her daily routine. Directly to the left of the princess is Doña María Augustina Sarmentio, who kneels to offer the child a small jug on a silver dish; to the right, we see Doña Isabel de Velasco mid-curtsy, her hands outstretched over her voluminous gown.

Detail of Maribárbola and Nicolasito Pertusato in Las Meninas.

Detail of Maribárbola and Nicolasito Pertusato in Las Meninas.

Detail of the background figures in Las Meninas.

Detail of the background figures in Las Meninas.

Towards to the right stand the dwarf Maribárbola and court jester Nicolás Pertusato (or Nicolasito), who were a part of the royal household. It wasn’t uncommon for Velázquez to portray these supporting characters; individual portraits of them also hung in the palace. Nicolasito rests his foot on a large, gentle dog, which some have identified as a mastiff.

Detail of Velázquez and the mirror (picturing King Philip IV and Queen Mariana) in Las Meninas.

Detail of Velázquez and the mirror (picturing King Philip IV and Queen Mariana) in Las Meninas.

Las Meninas was intended for the king and first hung in his private office in his summer quarters. So, when he stood before it, he was fulfilling its premise. But the date of the painting complicates what exactly Velázquez intended with this massive work.

The word “Menina” means “lady-in-waiting” or “Maid of Honour”, i.e. a girl who serves in a royal court.

Ikebana

 

Ikebana, the Japanese art of flower arranging, blossoms, branches, leaves, and stems

 Traditional ikebana, both symbolism and seasonality have always been prioritized in developing arrangements. Some of the most common elements used are bamboo grass year round; pine and Japanese plum branches around the new year; peach branches for Girls Days in March; narcissus and Japanese iris in the spring; cow lily in summer; and chrysanthemum in autumn. Modern ikebana practices call for the same sensitivity to seasons, as well as to the environment in which an arrangement is being made.

Sometimes, practitioners of ikebana, or ikebanaists, trim flowers and branches into unrecognizable shapes, or they may even paint the leaves of an element. Plant limbs may be arranged to sprout into space in various directions, but in the end, the whole work must be balanced and contained. At times, arrangements are mounted in a vase, though this is not always the case.

Hirozumi Sumiyoshi, Rikka, ca. 1700. Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Hirozumi Sumiyoshi, Rikka, ca. 1700. Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Coloured diagram #15 ofshōkaworks by the 40th headmaster Ikenobō Senjō, from the Sōka Hyakki, 1820. Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Coloured diagram #15 ofshōkaworks by the 40th headmaster Ikenobō Senjō, from the Sōka Hyakki, 1820. Image via Wikimedi

Photo by Annie Dalbéra, via Wikimedia Commons.

Photo by Annie Dalbéra, via Wikimedia Commons.

Photo by Annie Dalbéra, via Wikimedia Commons.

Photo by Annie Dalbéra, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo by Carlos Donderis, via Flickr.  

Photo by Carlos Donderis, via Flickr.

Photo by Carlos Donderis, via Flickr.

Photo by Carlos Donderis, via Flickr.

Photo by Carlos Donderis, via Flickr.

Photo by Carlos Donderis, via Flick

Installation view of Nendo, Kaleidoscopic Ivy, 2017 in collaboration wtih hnm, syk + onndo. Photo by Akihiro Yoshida. Courtesy of Nendo.

Installation view of Nendo, Kaleidoscopic Ivy, 2017 in collaboration wtih hnm, syk + onndo. Photo by Akihiro Yoshida. Courtesy of Nendo.

Recluse Fills Finnish Forest With Sculptures

Photo by Ilkka Jukarainen, via Flickr.

Veijo Rönkkönen was a recluse who spent 41 years between the paper mill and his farm, tucked away in a Finnish forest. He didn’t like to talk to people, and he never took an art lesson in his life. But by the time of his death in 2010, Rönkkönen had covered his land with around 550 sculptures. Nearly all of them depicted human figures: people of all ages and ethnicities, frozen in moments of play, athleticism, and even agony.

 

Photo by Ilkka Jukarainen, via Flickr.

Veijo Rönkkönen Sculpture Garden remains intact, drawing some 25,000 visitors annually. Their gazes range from intent to vacant, and their expressions from ecstatic to aggressive. Some  sculptures have mouths filled with real human teeth, while speakers buried inside their bodies emit incomprehensible sounds. Others are blanketed in green moss, or sprout flowers from their stomachs.

Photo by Ilkka Jukarainen, via Flickr.

Photo by Ilkka Jukarainen, via Flickr.

Photo by Ilkka Jukarainen, via Flickr.

 

The Art market Is Booming

The art market is back. The global art bazaar brought in total sales of $63.7 billion in 2017, which is up from what was reported as a $56.6 billion haul in last year’s report. However, it has yet to recover back to the level of sales in 2014, which reached $68.2 billion. The auction sector saw the biggest boost as sales rose 27%, following a dip of a similar magnitude in 2016. Sales of work at more than $10 million exploded in 2017, increasing by 125%.

Post-war and contemporary was the largest of the auction sectors in 2017, with a 46% share of the market by sales, as it has been every year since 2011. 

China is manufacturing these billionaires at nearly the clip at which it turns out sneakers and iPhones. The country had 26% of the world’s billionaires in 2017, up from 6% in 2010. Thanks to a robust slice of global auction sales—33%, right behind the United States’s 35%—China accounted for 21% of global art market sales to seize second place, edging out the United Kingdom, which had 20% of global art sales in 2017.

Andy Warhol was number one in 2007, 2012, and 2017, with Pablo Picasso after him each year, while Bruce Nauman and Gerhard Richter switched it up for the third spot. 

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Royal Ascot 2018 Dress Code

 

 One of the most glamorous events of the summer social calendar with glamorous but demure dresses and fabulous hats a must, but the latest Royal Ascot style guide could be set to shake things up. 

The Berkshire race course released the style guide for this years meeting, which takes place from 19th to 23rd June this year and bosses have introduce official style advice for the first time for the Windsor and Village enclosures.

While Ascot has been known to turn ladies away if their hemlines are too short or their necklines too low, the style advice for the Windsor enclosure could open up the possibility for racegoers to wear shorts and crop tops – which aren’t permitted in other areas. Royal enclosure guests must wear skirts of modest length defined as falling just above the knee or longer and hats

In the Village and Queen Anne enclosures a slightly less formal approach is allowed 

Last year, racegoers got the nod to wear jumpsuits to the prestigious race meeting for the first time 

What’s the 2018 dress code for Royal Ascot?

ROYAL ENCLOSURE 

• Dresses and skirts should be of modest length defined as falling just above the knee or longer.

Dresses and tops should have straps of one inch or greater.

Jackets and pashminas may be worn but dresses and tops underneath should still comply with the Royal Enclosure dress code.

Trouser suits are welcome. They should be of full length and of matching material and colour.

Jumpsuits are welcome. They should be of full-length to the ankle, with regulations matching that for dresses.

Hats should be worn; however a headpiece which has a solid base of 4 inches (10cm) or more in diameter is acceptable as an alternative to a hat.

Ladies are also asked to note the following:

Strapless, off-the-shoulder, halter neck and spaghetti straps are not permitted.

Midriffs must be covered.

Fascinators are not permitted; neither are headpieces which do not have a solid base covering a sufficient area of the head (4 inches/10cm). 

QUEEN ANNE ENCLOSURE 

Ladies within the main Queen Anne Enclosure and Village Enclosure areas are encouraged to dress in a manner as befits a formal occasion and ladies are kindly asked to take note of the following:

A hat, headpiece or fascinator should be worn at all times.

Strapless or sheer strap dresses and tops are not permitted.

Trouser suits and jumpsuits must be full length and worn with a top that adheres to the guidelines above.

Midriffs must be covered.

Shorts are not permitted.

WINDSOR ENCLOSURE 

Whilst organisers encourage racegoers to wear smart clothes, no formal dress code applies in the Windsor Enclosure except that replica sports shirts are not permitted.

In all enclosures,  fancy dress, novelty and branded / promotional clothing are not allowed on site. 

Famous Picasso painting Reveals Lost Artwork

The Old Guitarist, 1903 by Pablo Picasso
Click Image to view detail

Using hyper-modern tools to peer into one of Picasso’s Blue Period paintings, researchers have not only shown a hidden piece of art history in detail, they have revealed a striking amount of insight into Picasso’s creative process.

The investigation focused on “La Miséreuse accroupie,” or “Crouching Woman,” painted in 1902 and currently owned by the Art Gallery of Ontario. It shows Picasso was inspired by the dominant lines of an underlying landscape painted by an unknown artist.

The analysis also exposes several incremental changes to the posture of the woman depicted in the painting—many of which Picasso ultimately abandoned. The team revealed the results of their analysis today at the 2018 meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Austin, Texas.

The overall work uncovered a previously known and unrelated landscape beneath Picasso’s subject in exceptional new detail. What’s more, it showed the unexpected presence of an awkwardly positioned hand holding a disc.

 

 

Levi Jeans & Technology

Eureka Lab [Photo: courtesy of Levi’s]
A team of designers took weeks to figure out exactly where to fade the indigo and position the tears for the most authentic vintage look. Then, factory workers used sandpaper and harsh chemicals to make it look properly worn in. The jeans were probably washed for hours so that the blue color would fade out–even though those dyes would inevitably end up polluting the groundwater. It could take weeks for a team of Levi designers to figure out exactly where to fade the indigo and position the tears for the most authentic vintage look.

They now have a new laser technology that will, in a snap, do what now takes much longer. The breakthrough uses infrared light to etch off a very fine layer of the indigo and cotton from a pair of jeans, creating the same kind of faded finishes and tears in 90 seconds flat.

This new tech, which Sights will automate many new aspects of the company’s denim-making process, from the design and prototyping to the manufacturing, to catering to consumer demand.

[Photo: courtesy of Levi’s]

The company employs 13,500 workers around the world—not including those that work in third-party factories. Levi’s jeans are sold at 50,000 retailers in 110 countries. This will will mean retraining hundreds of people and changing the time it takes to get products to stores. But by introducing these laser-wielding robots into Levi’s factories around the world, it has the potential to eliminate many repetitive, dangerous tasks that are an everyday part of the job for denim workers.

[Photo: courtesy of Levi’s]

[Photo: courtesy of Levi’s]

Between 80 and 100 billion never-worn garments are sent to landfills globally every year. This new technology will shift our model from ‘sell what you make’ to ‘make what you sell,’ which will absolutely improve their overall inventory health.

Group O f Artist Wins 6.5 Million $$$$$$ Judgment for The Destruction of Their Artwork Mural

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A group of artist won a  $6.75 million judgment whereby the judge , ruled that the developer’s destruction of the street art( graffiti) violated the Visual Artists Rights Act (VARA), which provides certain artists rights over work even if it is not their property. The ruling provides closure for one of the most-watched legal battles in the art world, one that began after developer Jerry Wolkoff whitewashed graffiti aka 5Pointz in historic Queens without specific warning, destroying the graffiti artworks in November 2013. But the impact of the suit may well echo far into the future. The judgement marks the first time graffiti artists have triumphed in a VARA lawsuit and the 50 page opinion penned by Judge Frederic Block gives other graffiti artists hope that they could find success bringing cases under the statute—though they may not be awarded such high damages. 

Art made Out Of Beads

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Soaring Again M6

 

Soaring Again M4

Cherice Harrison-Nelson. Photo by Jeffrey David Ehrenreich. Courtesy of the artist.

Cherice Harrison-Nelson. Photo by Jeffrey David Ehrenreich. Courtesy of the artist.

Work by Cherice Harrison-Nelson. Courtesy of the artist.

Work by Cherice Harrison-Nelson. Courtesy of the artist.

 

Beginning in the 15th century, when Portuguese traders arrived in West Africa, glass “trade beads” were used by Europeans to establish trade networks, barter for resources, and buy slaves. In North America, beads were likewise used for nefarious purposes, perhaps most infamously by Peter Minuit, a Dutch trader who is said to have purchased Manhattan from the Lenape Indians in exchange for a box of beads and assorted trinkets.

For many artists working with beads today, the medium’s historical connection to colonialism, slavery, and genocide is still potent—it may even be the reason they employ it. Others use beadwork to explore different kinds of conceptual concerns, from challenging the invisibility of women’s labor to asserting the importance of the individual. The following artists engage with beadwork in diverse ways, but each is pushing the medium in new directions.

Florida’s Black Highwaymen

Alfred Hair, Peach Cloud Morning, undated. Collection of Roger Lightle. Image courtesy of A.E. Backus Museum.

Article on Alfred Hair, 1962. Image courtesy of A.E. Backus Museum.

Florida’s historical “Highwaymen” consists of a group of around two dozen black painters who made a living selling their landscape paintings out of car trunks in the Jim Crow South—art was something of a pathway to freedom.

From the 1950s through the ’70s, the Highwaymen produced over 200,000 paintings of Florida’s diverse ecology—vivid scenes depicting fiery red sunsets over aquamarine bays or the scraggy, Spanish moss-covered banyan trees stretching over the state’s backwater regions. Hustling their work straight from their car trunks, the group sold paintings to day-tripping tourists along U.S. Route 1 on Florida’s Atlantic Coast and to (predominantly white) business owners in the banks, motels, and laundromats of their native Fort Pierce, even as galleries turned them away.

The paintings originally went for $25 or $30 each, and were typically sold on the same day they were made, transported in bundles by car or bike in handmade frames and often still glistening with wet oil paint. Today, paintings by the Highwaymen are included in the Smithsonian Collection; they can clear $10,000 at auction or in private sales; and originals by the group’s most prominent figures, Al Black, Alfred Hair, and Harold Newton—who is estimated to have made over 30,000 paintings alone—are coveted by a diverse fan base that includes the Obamas and Steven Spielberg.

Harold Newton, Poinciana, undated. Collection of Roger Lightle. Image courtesy of A.E. Backus Museum.

Harold Newton, Poinciana, undated. Collection of Roger Lightle. Image courtesy of A.E. Backus Museum.

 

This little-known history begins with a man named A.E. “Beanie” Backus, the godfather of the Highwaymen. Backus was born into the racially segregated city of Fort Pierce in 1906, when the town’s black and white neighborhoods were divided along train tracks. A largely self-taught artist, Backus created dramatic landscapes with a palette knife, combining what he’d learned at summer art classes at Parsons in New York City with his encyclopedic knowledge of Florida’s wildlife and his love of its epic thunderstorms. Considered the catalyst of Fort Pierce’s landscape movement, Backus kept his studio open to all, and took on a local student, Alfred Hair, as a studio assistant in 1954. Hair made a name for himself painting dozens of artworks a day and driving the beachfront strip of Fort Pierce in search of customers, while blasting music by James Brown. (He worked at that pace up until his tragic death by gunfire at age 29, in 1970.)

Highwaymen,  includes Harold Newton, James Gibson, Livingston Roberts, Roy McLendon, and Mary Ann Carroll—each with their own unique artistic style and business approach.

Alfred Hair, Breaking Wave, undated. Collection of Roger Lightle. Image courtesy of A.E. Backus Museum.

Alfred Hair, Breaking Wave, undated. Collection of Roger Lightle. Image courtesy of A.E. Backus Museum.

Harold Newton, River Road, undated. Collection of Roger Lightle. Image courtesy of A.E. Backus Museum.

Harold Newton, River Road, undated. Collection of Roger Lightle. Image courtesy of A.E. Backus Museum

 

Jeremy Scott 2018